Tag Archives: self publishing

Mar 02

You! Hey You! You…Are the Book Promoter…Wise Words from Mary Deal

You, the Book Promoter
by
Mary Deal

One sure fact you hear about the writing industry is that writing the book is 10% of the work while promotion takes the remaining 90%. Knowing this, it’s best to be prepared beforehand, having a clear picture of what’s expected of you, the author, if your book is to sell.

With the advent of print-on-demand, if you do not do any advertising and promotion, you may not end up with the proverbial stack of unsold books in your garage. However, you will notice that your sales figures never climb out of zero and your royalty checks are non-existent.

Something else you may have heard about this business is “Write the book first.” While I agree that you must have the finished product in order to promote, once that book is in its final stages and moving through the publishing process, little time remains to learn even the basics of promotion. So while you write your book, have numerous questions in mind that must be answered:

Which publishing format should I use – print-on-demand, self-publishing, or…?

Should I try to get a literary agent to represent me?

Which publisher should I consider?

What audience do I intend for this story?

How do I reach them?

Do I need a website?

A blog?

Should I join social sites?

Will my close friends and relatives spread with word about my book?

Should I write articles and get them posted on various blogs?

Do I have the funds it takes to make my book a success?

Do I have a list of magazines and newsletters for mailing review copies?

Do I need bookmarks, business cards, post cards, flyers, posters?

How do I set up book signings?

Should I contact various media? Which ones?

Do I know media protocol?

Do I know anyone from the local newspaper?

Many questions will cross your mind as you research all that is necessary and answers will come as you immerse yourself in the writing industry. As you meet people across the Internet, even in your own community, you may learn of one person’s success. Investigate their history and techniques in selling their books. Befriend them, if possible, especially on social sites.

The questions asked above should give the prospective author an idea of what it takes to promote a book and rack up sales. But still, so much more needs be learned. This list is in no particular order because that’s the way the questions will present themselves to you. You will, most likely, know when to handle each one over time.

Many of the topics mentioned in this list are discussed separately in other articles. However, as you write, make notes of things you need to know. Spend some time each day researching just one aspect of book promotion. Over time, you will gain solid knowledge of just what it takes to make your book a success.

Please visit Mary Deal’s website for more wonderful articles like this one: Write Any Genre. Read More

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Oct 27

All About Copyrights…and Article by Mary Deal

About Copyrights
by
Mary Deal

Once you have finished your opus, do not apply for a Copyright until you know exactly what you are doing.

If you plan to self-publish or publish print-on-demand, then you will need to copyright your manuscript. (See the information below.) This may change in the future but at the moment, self-publishing and print-on-demand companies do not do this for you.

However, if you secure a copyright registration and then try to sell your book to a big house publisher, you may have doomed yourself. That copyright you took much time and effort to secure makes you the holder of 1st Rights. The big houses will want 1st Rights; they usually will not take any manuscript on 2nd rights.

In rare instances where a book has already been published, a big house will pick up the book under a new contract. However, any published book will usually have to have sold into the thousands of copies in order to be noticed by the larger publishing houses. If such a book is taken on by a larger publisher, they would accept 2nd Rights.

To protect yourself as being the creator of your manuscript, you may wish to register it at Writer’s Guild of America. They charge a fee; you send your entire manuscript, and there are various ways to submit. I use this organization myself. Filing with this group is not a form of copyright and you will later need a copyright from the U.S. Copyright Office. Filing with WGA is simply another way to register a date that your manuscript was completed and that you are the owner. Should anyone try to plagiarize your story, you have proof of when you completed the manuscript and that you are the original owner. Make sure you read their FAQS and understand the process. They have east coast and west coast branches, so you should use the branch in your vicinity.

http://www.wga.org/

http://www.wgaeast.org/

Should you choose to file with the U.S. Copyright Office, you will find them at

http://www.copyright.gov/

The U.S. Copyright Office also has an online submissions capability that I have used in the past.

My only advice here is that you know which way you will publish your book before you decide whether or not to seek a copyright.

Please visit Mary Deal’s website for more wonderful articles like this one: Write Any Genre. Read More

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