Tag Archives: processor

Mar 23

CONFIDENCE! An Article by Mary Deal

Confidence
by
Mary Deal

Have you ever been stopped cold with writer’s block? I’ve never had writer’s block.

Something I recommend you doing is first maintaining a list of all your published pieces as they are accepted. I keep separate lists for novels, short stories, flashes, poetry, articles, even gag lines. Be compulsive with your list. It makes certain information easily found. You should be keeping a list of all your successes. That information can be widely used in your promotions. As your list grows, it is validation that you are a writer.

Any stories you may be working on, too, are right there in your word processor.

When you feel stuck, particularly when you feel distraught over the lack of acceptances for your gems, you should never try to work through your anger and disappointment. Instead, re-read something you’ve already written.

Do not read anything by someone else. It may only serve to tell you that you are not this or that type of writer and when will you measure up. Instead, read your own successful pieces. This helps you realize that you are capable of turning out great prose. It affirms that you do not have to measure up to anyone else’s capabilities.

This trick also works with pieces you feel good about but haven’t yet found acceptance and publication. If you feel it is some of your best work, read it through again. I’ve done exactly that and found I wanted to improve pieces I thought was some of my best writing.

Writing is an ongoing opportunity for improvement. If you believe your writing ability has failed you, re-read your own work. It will show you just how much you have improved over time. It will give you a jolt of confidence to keep going.

Please visit Mary Deal’s website for more wonderful articles like this one: Write Any Genre. Read More

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Jul 07

“A File of Notes” More Great Writing Advice from Mary Deal

Every time a writer gets an idea, a hot plot line, a shocking sentence, a joke, it should be jotted down. Those that are hand written should soon be entered with the rest into a file of notes in a word processor. Before “walking away” from that note, make sure you have captured it properly in words, so the original mood or thought is clearly expressed.

Nothing is worse than to look back at your entries, searching for something you know you logged, and not understand why you wrote something.

You may not know into which story any of the notes fit, but they are just too good a thought or idea and should be captured, given life, and not left to recall later when the original creativity and memory has faded.

Into that file of notes goes everything that you cannot presently use. Character sketches, humor, plot ideas, beginnings, endings, titles, something someone said. You name it. From this file of notes is where you will draw many tidbits to enhance your stories, especially when your Muse takes unannounced time off.

Very often with me, a certain entry will stand out in my mind and my muse will “play with it,” that is, enlarge the idea, and make something happen with it. At that point I usually know into which story the material can be applied. Should I not know where it belongs, I simply enter the new information expanding the first idea and then leave it alone.

I have gone back to my notes for each and every novel or short story that I write. In the case of making notations of funny lines and crazy quips, when I knave a particular character with a unique personality, I know exactly which lines I can pull from the notes and incorporate into my story.

The importance of note making can’t be stressed enough; hence, the use of the proverbial paper table napkin, ala JK Rowling and Ernest Hemingway before her. Read More

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