Tag Archives: misuse

Jun 01

Having Trouble Choosing a Subtitle? Ask Mary Deal for Advice

Choosing a Subtitle
by
Mary Deal

Sometimes you can conjure what you think is the best title ever for your book. No one has used that title and there is nothing close to it in all of literature. Then, after a while, you begin to wonder if your great title covers all that your book entails. You search for a new title but always return to the one you first chose. It is that good!

So you begin to wonder if you should also use a subtitle. Subtitles used to be seen as a way to enhance a weak title. However, at the writing of this article, the consensus is that if you want to utilize a great chance to tell more about your book, use a subtitle. Keep in mind, however, that some titles will never need a subtitle.

What subtitle would you add to Gone with the Wind or The Old Man and the Sea?

Peruse book selling sites and notice any recent books that have no subtitles. Notice those that do use subtitles. You will get a “feel” for when to use and when not to use.

Usually a title will tell the overall feeling or story without giving away any exact details. Using a subtitle allows you to hint at more of the detail.

Subtitles must be as short as possible. I have seen books with eight to ten words in the title alone, and then a subtitle with the same number or more words is added. This represents not only a misuse of a subtitle but shows an overall title not well thought out.

Your subtitle should give the strongest clue as to what the story is about. If you choose a subtitle because your title is not necessarily weak but is broad inclusively, then your subtitle will draw the reader in. Think of it. The title is unique and catches the reader’s attention. Then the subtitle tells more of what they can inspect of the prose. I use prose here because nonfiction, even books like cookbooks, sometimes has subtitles.

The reader will need to learn something about the book from the subtitle. Never use a subtitle with the intention of keeping the reader’s eyes glued to your cover. It doesn’t work that way. Every word must offer the reader something to learn about the book. A lackluster subtitle leaves the potential book buyer with a ho-hum feeling.

Your title can be anything from plain and simple to quirky. Whatever it represents will be enhanced and enticing through the subtitle.

Please visit Mary Deal’s website for more wonderful articles like this one: Write Any Genre.
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May 11

To “Like” or Not to “Like” as Told by Mary Deal

Misuse of “Like” Pages
by
Mary Deal

I’m starting to “Like” some writers’ pages on FaceBook, but what I’m seeing is a lot of misuse of these pages.

A “Like” page is meant to advertise you and your special talents and products. Some posts talk about the weather, their families, national news, and sundry other topics. All this does is make your “Like” page become yet another social FaceBook page. Save those topics for the regular FaceBook pages and concentrate the information on your “Like” page only to your books and creativity. Delete what doesn’t apply, or ask the poster to move the conversation to your regular FaceBook page.

I’ve read posts all over the Net about reviewers, publicists, bloggers, agents, editors, etc., etc., who want to see a person’s “Like” page represent exactly what they do. The page represents its owner. So how do you wish to be seen: As a person with two social FaceBook pages, or a person who knows how to concentrate on promoting your talents?

Your “Like” page should be about you and YOUR books or your topic. What I’m seeing is that some are allowing their “Like” pages to become a dumping ground for writers and others to advertise their own books and projects. This is wrong.

For authors and artists, a “Like” page should be intended to showcase YOUR work.

A “Like” page should contain information about your books or topics and ONLY yours. Other writers may make comments and post to the page about your work. The only reference to their books and topics will be their signature. If you allow anything else on your page, then you are denigrating one of the greatest promotional venues available for your work.

People should be commenting on your books and topics on your page. They should be posting reviews of your work, maybe discussing your story characters, or how you write your stories, and so forth. You, in turn, would do the same on THEIR page, about their books and topics.

It seems that in everyone wishing to favor other writers by posting information that doesn’t apply to the page owner, they are doing a serious injustice to the promotional efforts of all. It’s an honest mistake, but I would suggest that when we post comments to someone else’s Like page or Fan page, that those comments reflect on the page owner’s work. They will do the same for us.

Please visit Mary Deal’s website for more wonderful articles like this one: Write Any Genre. Read More

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Jul 09

Co-Authors Deborah Shlian & Linda Reid Talk about their Novel “Dead Air” on the Child Finder Trilogy

Deborah Shlian, MD, MBA practiced medicine in California where she also taught at UCLA. She has published nonfiction articles and books as well as medical mystery/thrillers. Her first two novels, Double Illusion and Wednesday’s ChildRabbit in the Moon is an international thriller and has won the Gold Medal for Genre Fiction from the Florida Book Award, the Mystery Book of the Year Silver Medal from ForeWord Magazine, an Indie Excellence Award, a National Best Books Award Finalist from USA Book News and First Prize in the Royal Palm Literary Award from the Florida Writers Association.

Yolanda “Linda” Reid Chassiakos, MD, is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, and a Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA. After graduating from and completing her residency in Pediatrics at the Georgetown University School of Medicine, Dr. Reid Chassiakos served as a Lieutenant Commander in the US Navy, and as the Assistant Head of the Ambulatory Branch of Pediatrics at the Naval Hospital, Bethesda and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. She then moved to the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion and served as a medical editor and feature reporter for the evening Eyewitness news at the CBS affiliate in Washington, DC. Dr. Chassiakos joined Lifetime Medical Television as a medical editor, writer, and host of educational programming for healthcare professionals and the public in Los Angeles, and developed and hosted programs and features for media such as the NBC Network Sex, Drugs, and Rock ‘n Roll, Lorimar-Telepictures, and You TV.

During her thirteen-year tenure as an Associate Physician Diplomate at UCLA’s Arthur Ashe Health Center, Dr. Chassiakos also served as a staff writer for the television series, Family Medical Center. She is currently the Director of the Klotz Student Health Center at California State University, Northridge. Dr. Chassiakos’ features and essays have been published in the Washington Post, Baltimore Sun, Woman’s Day, Salon.com, the Los Angeles Times, the Los Angeles Daily News, and Tribune International. She has recently co-edited a text on Collaboration Across the Disciplines in Health Care. Dr. Chassiakos has also written a fantasy novel, Where Angels Fear to Tread, for imaginative young adult and adult readers. Dr. Chassiakos and her husband are the proud parents of three teenagers and live in Los Angeles. Read More

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