Tag Archives: intention

Jun 01

Having Trouble Choosing a Subtitle? Ask Mary Deal for Advice

Choosing a Subtitle
by
Mary Deal

Sometimes you can conjure what you think is the best title ever for your book. No one has used that title and there is nothing close to it in all of literature. Then, after a while, you begin to wonder if your great title covers all that your book entails. You search for a new title but always return to the one you first chose. It is that good!

So you begin to wonder if you should also use a subtitle. Subtitles used to be seen as a way to enhance a weak title. However, at the writing of this article, the consensus is that if you want to utilize a great chance to tell more about your book, use a subtitle. Keep in mind, however, that some titles will never need a subtitle.

What subtitle would you add to Gone with the Wind or The Old Man and the Sea?

Peruse book selling sites and notice any recent books that have no subtitles. Notice those that do use subtitles. You will get a “feel” for when to use and when not to use.

Usually a title will tell the overall feeling or story without giving away any exact details. Using a subtitle allows you to hint at more of the detail.

Subtitles must be as short as possible. I have seen books with eight to ten words in the title alone, and then a subtitle with the same number or more words is added. This represents not only a misuse of a subtitle but shows an overall title not well thought out.

Your subtitle should give the strongest clue as to what the story is about. If you choose a subtitle because your title is not necessarily weak but is broad inclusively, then your subtitle will draw the reader in. Think of it. The title is unique and catches the reader’s attention. Then the subtitle tells more of what they can inspect of the prose. I use prose here because nonfiction, even books like cookbooks, sometimes has subtitles.

The reader will need to learn something about the book from the subtitle. Never use a subtitle with the intention of keeping the reader’s eyes glued to your cover. It doesn’t work that way. Every word must offer the reader something to learn about the book. A lackluster subtitle leaves the potential book buyer with a ho-hum feeling.

Your title can be anything from plain and simple to quirky. Whatever it represents will be enhanced and enticing through the subtitle.

Please visit Mary Deal’s website for more wonderful articles like this one: Write Any Genre.
Read More

Posted in Author Blogs, Author Colleagues, Guest Blogging, Interviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jan 12

Mary Deal Dishes Up 10 Book Signing Essentials!

10 Book Signing Essentials

When I began to have my own book signings, I found it fortunate in that the larger stores, Border’s Books and B. Dalton, provided not only tables but white cloth covers as well. Not till a little later did I realize that this did not hold true for all stores. I began to make a list of essentials a writer needs in order to present themselves in a professional manner.

1) Even larger stores sometimes have no table cloths. Carry your own. One store had an ample sized table but the cloth only covered the top. I prefer to tuck my travel bag of promotional materials under the table when possible for an easy grab when I need them. Therefore, my larger cloth was thrown over what the store provided, hung all the way down in front, and I was able to keep my bag out of site.

2) Carry a letter-sized plastic picture frame with your photo and book cover for display on your table. Sometimes, but seldom, stores will have their own stand-up table sign already made. I found these to be lacking. In addition to my photo and book cover, I also include a brief Bio of two to three small paragraphs. It’s amazing how many perspective buyers like to read about the author. It seems to draw them closer emotionally. They feel they know you and didn’t have to spend time asking you about yourself. Instead, they ask about your book.

Something extra I do is put a full-sized book cover photo on the back side of the clear plastic frame as well. The book cover can then be seen from various directions.

3) Have another stand to place your book in an upright position. Books lying flat on the table top can only present their edges to viewers. You want your cover showing in all its magnificence.

4) The major book stores have their own signs made and hanging on the front of the table cover, in addition to other areas in the store. However, for those shops that do not have posters, hopefully, you will have had some made. If your book signing is in your area, take some posters to the store to have those hung at least a week prior to your arrival.

5) Postcards. You can mail postcards to friends and even store and business owners in the area where your book signing will take place. When I run out of bookmarks, I use these cards instead.

6) Bookmarks. I often run out of bookmarks because people want to take one as a reminder to buy the book later. It’s unfortunate that they don’t buy it right away, but if a bookmark helps them remember, give it freely. This has worked for me. Too, at your table, every book should have a bookmark stuck into it.

7) Business cards. Though I’m not intending to show favoritism, I use vistaprint.com for all my cards. Wherever you prefer to buy them, Kinko’s maybe, make sure to have enough. Try to put your book cover on the card. If that’s not possible, make it something related to writing or to your Web site. Have these on your tabletop too.

8) Brochures. If you have a Web site and books to sell, you might consider having some brochures made – or make them yourself. Make them professional looking and not looking like a Xerox copy of a Xerox copy. If a signing is in your area, pass them out to people you meet in your daily routine of shopping and such. Ask local stores to display a few. If in a town outside your locale, arrive early and hand out some brochures to people in the area. This works well in malls. Have some of these on your table top. People will pick up anything to learn more. That means they spend more time at your table.

9) Flyers. Store managers are grateful for any help you can offer. Ask them if they would like some flyers to display around the store. Your flyers should be professional in appearance and not something you threw together and printed out on a bad printer. No Xerox copies as mentioned in #8 above.

10) Many other items can be given away to those who purchase your books. This is a simple way of saying thank you and building rapport with a reader who potentially will look for your next book. Too, one good item is pens or pencils with the book’s title, or your Web site URL. For promoting my Egyptian suspense novel, The Ka, I purchased huge quantities of tiny hand carved Egyptian scarabs in real colored stones. I allowed those who bought books to sort through the bin to find two that would match, possible to make earrings or whatever. Giving out little inexpensive extra items produces an aura of fun too.

Any or all of the above items serve to enhance your professional appearance and express to the store managers and prospective book buyers your sincerity, intention and commitment to your craft.

In today’s economy, when people cannot afford little luxuries, even one or two of these items will serve you well. Stand up at your table and get a lively conversation going with those who come to see you. It’s amazing what a smile can do.

Read More

Posted in Author Blogs, Author Colleagues, Guest Blogging, Interviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Oct 20

“Character Arc” by Mary Deal

Writing a great character arc happens when using descriptive writing. Your writing objectives should include interesting story people who are never stagnant but change as the story progresses. These changes are known as the character arc.
Knowing the story you wish to write, some pre-planning is advisable. You’ve written character sketches. You’ve plotted the story line. You should be able to detect how your characters evolve as the plot proceeds. You will begin to understand the evolution story people experience as you begin to flesh out the details.
A character arc is the overall view of how a character changed from the beginning of the tale till the ending. When you read other books, try to perceive, even pin point, the evolution the main character goes through and how they end up changed at the ending. This applies to all characters, but at least your main character requires a character arc. Approach the overall view of the arc with the intention to put your story people through some experiences that will change them.
An example might be the cop who has tried for years to solve a cold case and whose efforts are pooh-poohed for trying to wring something more out of dead-end clues. The story begins with him worn out from years of stale clues and no new leads. About ready to give up like others investigators have, still he persists and then discovers something overlooked by all others. He can’t reveal his clue for fear of exposing people who could thwart his efforts. He tries desperately to solve the crime on his own.
In this scenario, the character arc begins with the cop, worn down, and ready to face the fact the case may never be solved. The arc evolves when he finds an overlooked clue. This is where the writer should employ descriptive writing to enhance what happens to change this cop. He’s found new motivation. The next step in the character arc is the determination he shows to get the crime solved. He’s got a new reason to come to work every day.
After he solves the crime, he is vindicated. He’s definitely a new man. The writer can make this new man an egocentric braggart or can make him humble yet full of self-confidence with a new respect from his fellow officers. You can write a character arc that may have the character end poorly or magnanimously, but changed. It’s all in the descriptive writing and what the writer wishes to accomplish with the story.
Another example is, perhaps, the main character is a stodgy matriarch whose control of her extended family never waivers. In the story, she believes something to be true. The story action then proceeds to show her changing her viewpoints. She becomes a better person for understanding in spite of her mistaken beliefs. Her status in the family doesn’t change. Her character arc is depicted when she changes her viewpoint and determines to be more open-minded and better informed. Her emotional or psychological growth arc becomes the character arc of the story; all the while her position in the family is maintained.
The character arc does not apply only to actions taken but to thoughts and beliefs as well, even if the character does nothing physically but stand her ground in the hierarchy.
Focusing on the character arc upholds the conflict or tension of the story overall. What the character experiences on an inner level affects them on the outer level and is what contributes to the story overall.
Know your writing objectives, or story purpose, and best define them with descriptive writing. Most character arcs are shown through emotional or psychological process, but the character changes can come about through physical actions that further show the inner workings of the character’s mind set. Read More

Posted in Author Blogs, Author Colleagues, Guest Blogging | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jun 23

Clichés and Jargon…Mary Deal Dishes the Straight “Skinny” on the Subject

Do you know how much of your day-to-day language contains clichés and jargon? The way you speak among your family and peers defines your roots and the person you are. However, in writing, clichés make your story stale and jargon needs to suit the time period of the story.

If you are writing a story that takes place, perhaps in the 1930s or any older time period, you’ll need to capture the language of the day. Whether you have your characters speak these lines or your narrator uses them, similar phrases of the early Twentieth Century may be something like:

A penny for your thoughts
The pot calling the kettle black
Putting the horse before the cart

To include such phrases in a modern-day story tells of an elderly author who has not kept up with language changes, or tells of a younger author bound in family colloquialisms. With the exception of writing a story in a past time frame, the language you use must be the most up-to-date as possible. Read More

Posted in Author Blogs, Author Colleagues, Guest Blogging | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment