Tag Archives: advance

Mar 06

Stepping Away from Fiction for Something Real: Help Find Nadia Kersh

Sometimes in our lives tragedy strikes in ways we could never contemplate in advance. The terrible news we read about everyday always seems to be about someone else. When similar events happen to us, we are always caught off-guard, never prepared, and we struggle to make sense of it.
God has His plans. We all know that, and we cherish Him when His works seem to fit our plans. When the unthinkable happens, we are always left to wonder where God was at the time. Was He looking the other way? Did He not see evil coming and try to stop it? We may never know the answers to these questions, but we must rely upon our faith to sustain us.
I spent a career in the United States Air Force as a criminal investigator, and while I saw plenty of tragic things, none ever came too close to home. I was always affected by the cases I worked, and I knew with each sad story I investigated, that I would never be the same. Every victim of every crime has had a place in my heart. My inspiration for writing fiction comes from them. But they were all people I never knew in their lifetimes. Our introductions came with terrible news.
One of my friends from my Air Force days, Kevin Kersh, is going through a tough time. For two years, he and his family have been seeking answers to their daughter’s disappearance. Nadia Kersh disappeared on November 3, 2008 in Alabama. Kevin and his family have been searching for her since, with few clues to guide them. She left behind her son, Kevin’s grandson.
While Nadia has never been found, a person in Alabama will stand trial soon for her murder. That is important, but not nearly as important as finding Nadia and bringing her home. The Kersh’s have not given up their search. What parent could? I hope that by writing about their story, someone with information about Nadia’s whereabouts will come forward and do the right thing. You can learn more about Nadia and her family’s determination to find her here: Help Find Nadia.
I urge my readers to visit the Kersh’s website and help out if you can. If anyone has information about Nadia’s disappearance, now is the time to speak up. Thank you.
Mike Angley
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Dec 08

“Preparing Your Manuscript for an Agent” by Mary Deal

Preparing Your Manuscript for an Agent

by

Mary Deal

Being aware of what agents look for will help you prepare the type of manuscript they will read. Keep in mind, these same rules apply once you have an agent and the manuscript is being sent out to publishing house editors.

All agents hope to find that one manuscript that is unique above all the others. It’s been said that all stories have been told. What makes them different is each individual writer’s slant on the topic, providing they have written a solid story.

When an agent begins to read, after years of experience, they are keen to grammar flaws. This is one area that could cause an agent or editor to reject a manuscript without consideration of any of its other merits.

Too, how long is your manuscript? Paper books presently should be 60,000 to 80,000 words. Anything more than that, since it’s the requirement, the agent will believe the writer too verbose, lacking control over their adjectives and adverbs and overall sentence structure.

With the advent of hand-held readers, entire books are now converted to ebooks. There may or may not be word count restrictions. Still, your story must be good to merit the higher-end costs of ebooks as well.

If the agent or editor reads on, they do so with one motivation. They need to decide if this book, when published, will sell enough to make back their commission and any advance royalty paid to the writer. And still, the book must make a profit for the publishing house beyond that point.

The agent or editor will also be judging the writer’s overall presentation. Is it neat? Was the cover letter professional? Did it follow standard form? Did the writer seem to know what he or she talked about. What they look for is how you, the writer will perform after the book is published. Are you going to be difficult to work with? Are you going to go out of your way to make this book a success? Or do you believe that’s the publisher’s duty?

Professionals know immediately if they want to spend the time to read all the way through. They are also concerned if a reader will want to spend hours with the story and author. They scrutinize to see if the writer’s descriptions are fresh and different. What the agent looks for is individual voice. It was once enough to say “the trees had greened up after the last heavy rain;” another to say “the morning sun reflected in the raindrops on the new green leaves and made the trees sparkle.” Your voice shows in how you describe scenes and action. Your description must be different than anything else you’ve read.

An agent is keenly aware whether or not they will turn from the first page to the second. Agents read thousands of stories. They know by the end of the first page if the book will stack up against others in the same genre.

Have you written characters that an agent will appreciate? Your characters must stand out from all the rest. For character development, see my articles Faces and Quirks and Character Sketches. Everyone, from agent, to editor to publisher to avid reader must like your characters. Make them likeable or make them the kind of characters we love to hate, but make them memorable.

The overall plot must be about something the characters need to attain or obtain. They must want it desperately or the reader simply will not care enough to follow the character through whatever conflict arises.

Not only in nonfiction but in fiction as well, your facts must be right. In nonfiction it can be no other way. If you wish to make your fiction true to life, which helps the reader suspend reality and keep reading, get your facts straight too.

Dialogue moves the story. It must be written in such a manner that enhances the character’s personality. Dialogue exchanges between characters must propel the story. Ordinary conversation is never written into books. It is boring and says nothing really. Consider this:

“Good morning, John.”

“Good morning, Jim. What’s on the agenda today?”

“Guess we’re supposed to take the plane out for a test run today.”

They went to leave immediately.

Or this:

“Morning, John,” Jim said, rushing in. He thumbed toward the sky. “Let’s get upstairs before the boss sees the plane still sitting on the tarmac.”

Ordinary conversation has no place in good writing. Dialogue and beats move the action. Oh yes, see my article titled Let the Dialogue Speak.

The above could easily be included in the instruction we’ve all heard: Show, Don’t Tell. Simply, what this means is that the reader must see the action happening. Dialogue promotes action. Any time the writer begins to tell what a person thinks, how they interact with others, that should raise a red flag in the writer’s mind. See the two examples above? The first version contains dead dialogue and stalls the action. The second example not only contains dialogue that moves the story, but shows us what these two people are doing. Shows, doesn’t tell.

* * *

Most of the information in this article applies to both agents and editors. You must find an agent before you can approach a publishing house editor. The agent does that for you. In rare instances I’ve heard about someone submitting directly to an editor, but it usually turns out to be a small start up publishing house. If you wish to approach the big houses, get an agent.

To help you find an agent, try the site which does not charge a fee. In my experience they have been totally reputable:

http://agentquery.com

The agents listed on this site tell you what types of manuscripts they will accept and in which genres. It’s very thorough.

http://www.writersmarket.com

These are the people who publish those real thick volumes about everything you need to know as a writer. The book is expensive. However, if you sign up for their online edition, you get new listings and updates as new information come in all year long.

You can double check the credibility of an agent or editor you wish to contact by finding them on Preditors and Editors at:

http://pred-ed.com/

Preditors and Editors tell you who is legitimate and who is a scam. Yes, there are scam artists in the writing industry. You knew that, right?

I’m sure other sites have additional information but these are great places to begin your search.

Please visit Mary Deal’s website for more wonderful articles like this one: Write Any Genre. Read More

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May 19

“A Writer’s Self-Esteem” by Child Finder Trilogy Guest Mary Deal

When ego gets in the way.

My very first short story sent out received rejection after rejection. I always had faith in my writing and kept producing new pieces. Eventually, I sent out all of my stories, but they received rejections as well. I was crushed.

I began to feel that as a writer, I must not be writing anything that anyone wanted to read or know about. Maybe my writing wasn’t entertaining enough. I convinced myself that I wasn’t knowledgeable enough to have anything worth writing about to say to the world. Deflated, I set my stories aside.

After months of not writing, but still feeling the urge to do so, I received one of my SASEs in the mail. I thought sure I had already received as many as anyone cared to return.

To my surprise, the hand-written message on my cover letter, being returned, read:

“I’m sure this will fit into the issue we’re planning for next June. How does $20 for 1st Rights sound to you?”

The Senior Editor of that magazine sent a personally written note! I was stunned that my story fit in one of their planned issues. You bet I agreed. The next June was over seven months away, but that little note told me so much and plumped up my writer’s ego once again.

The story that had garnered the most rejections happened to fit into their future. So it wasn’t really a matter of whether or not my story was good enough. It simply had to fit somewhere.

I began to write again and the flood of pent up stories poured out.

I mailed them all. Christmas was quickly arriving, but I sent out a Christmas story anyway, knowing it would be too late to make it into any magazine in the next three weeks. My writing was good and I just wanted people to know it. At that point, I would have sent anything out.

To my surprise, in the second week of January of the New Year, I got a note back saying a magazine accepted it, saying:

“Thank you so much for submitting this piece far enough in advance. We’re working on this year’s Christmas issue now and would like to have it. Christmas is almost a full year away. Would you be willing to sign an agreement giving us FNASR anyway?”

Timing is everything. Not timing as in getting the stories submitted fast, but getting them sent at a time when a magazine can use them.

When I think about how my self-esteem felt squashed by rejection, how egoistic! It had nothing to do with my ego. Acceptance is about writing the kinds of stories that various magazines can use. It is about getting our stories into the right hands. Of course, the stories must be the best that we could produce, but the rejection itself is never meant to tear down faith in our abilities. Read More

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Sep 29

Angley Attends Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance (SIBA) Trade Show

I attended the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance (SIBA) Trade Show at the Carolina First Center in Greenville, South Carolina from September 25 – 27, 2009. It was a great event, very well organized, and I had the opportunity to meet and network with many professionals in the publishing industry. Read More

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Jun 30

Library Journal Puts Angley’s Child Finder on Summer Reads List

The prestigious Library Journal placed Child Finder, my debut novel, on its 2009 Summer Reads List, and recommended it to its Christian Fiction readers as well as mystery/thriller enthusiasts. Read More

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