Sylvia Ramsey, Author of “An Underground Jewell,” Visits with Mike Angley

MA: Folks, help me welcome today’s guest-blogger, Sylvia Ramsey. Growing up in a rural area of Missouri and being the child of a father born in 1898, she feels that her interpretation of life spans several generations. This influence can be recognized in both her poetry and her short stories. She has experienced life at many levels. One of her most prized possessions is a personal letter that was written to her by Rosemary A. Thurber giving her permission to adapt her father’s short story “The Last Clock” to be used for Readers Theatre.

Sylvia is presently a Communications professor and the Academic Resource Center Coordinator at GMC Community College in Martinez, GA. She describes herself as a determined scrapper who will wrench all the very best from life that she is capable of conquering. Her philosophy of life is reflected in her poems. “Armor For Survival” and “A Tired Vagabond.” More about the author can be found on her website or on the authors den website. http://www.authorsden.com/sylvialramsey1.

Her novel, An Underground Jewell, was a labor of love.  She explains, “The ideas for stories all come from my life experiences and knowledge I have gained along the way.  The book, An Underground Jewell, spawned from a short story that was written about a Christmas Eve in the distant future when life on earth had changed drastically.  That story was written in 1989.

Where did the idea for the novel come from?

SR: The idea to create a novel originated because I let imagination loose to wonder about the possibilities of this story. I first began by creating a character who would write the story, and the reason why she wrote it.  At that point, I began to develop other characters and a plot.  I finally began writing the book.  At one point, I had to stop writing because my husband became very ill, and I became his caregiver.  At the same time, I was diagnosed with T3 bladder cancer.  To add to the delay, my computer crashed and I had to start over.  I was lucky that I had part of it printed out.  After my husband died, I began writing again.  Finally, 20 years later, it was finished and published. “  An Underground Jewell and my other two books are available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble websites.

MA: How did you develop the character of your protagonist?

SR: Elizabeth Jewell is a very unusual woman in many ways.  My best friend says that she is me, but I think her character has the traits of both my mother and paternal grandmother.  Both of these ladies were strong and independent.  I do not think either one of them would have left their future up to fate, because they never did.  Elizabeth is like them, she sees a threat and does what she needs to do to help clear herself of the accusation.  I can see where my friend would identify with me because I share some of the same traits.  I wanted her to be unique in her world, and have enough foresight to see things around her that others may not see.  She is intelligent enough to know that she needed help to clear herself, and because of her connections, she knew who to ask to help.  There are several heroes in the novel, and there are many mysteries to solve other than clearing Elizabeth’s name.  Some are solved along the way, and others are not revealed until the end.  I have had people remark that I have revealed the outcome in my description, but they are only getting privy to the story on the surface, because it is much more complex than that.

MA: So who is your antagonist in the story?

SR: The “bad guys” are members of a group who have aspirations to control the society of the Western world.  They have managed to infiltrate various agencies of our government to do so.  Their underlying motive is control.  They have an excellent understand of how language influences thinking and perceptual reality, so they have launched a long-term scheme to achieve their goal to control the people’s perception of reality.

MA: When did you start writing?

SR: I began writing when I was nine years old.  I was the reporter for our 4-H club, and a new reporter at the local paper took me under his wing.  He encouraged me to write feature article in addition to community news.  By the age of twelve- years-old, I was getting bylines and a small paycheck each month.  I have been writing something ever since. I do not remember thinking, “I want to be a writer”.  It was just a part of who I am, and what I do.

I am always writing something, but not as a “profession”.  I do a lot of writing at the college, blogging, and on my Facebook page.  Currently, I am doing a blog series on Living with Bladder Cancer for the Healthy Women website.  I am a sixteen-year bladder cancer survivor, and even though it is ranked fifth in prevalence over all, ranked fourth in males and as prevalent as cervical cancer but deadlier in women, it is very underserved.  There is little awareness in the public sector, and even the medical community as a whole is basically under educated.  I have a new blog that I just launched, Thoughtful Reflections, on which I hope to feature a variety of people in the field related to the publishing world.

MA: What type of professional writing do you do?

SR: In the everyday world at my “job”, I write lesson plans, reports and various types of writing that is done within the field of higher education.  I have had research articles published in professional journals.  In the mass media area, I have written news and feature articles for newspapers and magazines.  In the creative realm, my love is poetry.  Over one hundred of my poems have been published in literary journals.  In 2004, my first book of poetry, Pulse Points of a Woman’s World, was published; in 2009 my first novel, An Underground Jewell, and in December of 2110, my first children’s book, Merchild Land was published.

MA: What projects are you working on now or plan for the future?

SR: There is a novel in the works that is a fantasy titled the Dark Crystals of Miradirth, and a collection of short stories titled, Squirrel Tales.  I have several web pages, a blog (Thoughtful Reflections – http://wwwthouhtfulreflections.blogspot.com/), and a Facebook page called Ramsey’s Sacrificial Metaphor.  I hope to do many more articles on bladder cancer as well as a collection of survivor stories.  As far as An Underground Jewell is concerned, I have thought about doing another book that features the main character, but right now, I have other stories to tell.

MA: Sylvia, thanks very much for blogging with me today. I want my readers to know a few things about Sylvia, some of which she’s mentioned in passing, above. Sylvia is a 16-year survivor of bladder cancer, and looks at the experience as another learning peak in life. She is very much aware that even though this is the fifth most common cancer in the United States, it is very much underserved. She serves as the Vice-President of the American Bladder Cancer Society because she knows how important to provide support to those who have experienced this cancer, and how important it is to create more awareness around the world. That is why all of her royalties go to the American Bladder Cancer Society, www.bladdercancersupport.org.  In March of this year, she sent them checks for close to $600 from her book sales.  Her books are available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

About Mike Angley

Mike Angley is the award-winning author of the Child Finder Trilogy. He retired as a Colonel from the Air Force in 2007 following a 25-year career as a Special Agent with the Office of Special Investigations (OSI). He held 13 different assignments throughout the world, among which were five tours as a Commander of various units, to include two Air Force Squadrons and a Wing. He is a seasoned criminal investigator and a counterintelligence and counterterrorism specialist. In his last assignment, he was Commander of OSI Region 8 with responsibility for all of Air Force Space Command. He’s fond of saying, “If it entered or exited Earth’s atmosphere, I had a dog in the fight!”
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